New!

New silk fabric, woolen fabric, cotton fabric, buttons, lace trims, and more...each month brings new temptations!

Upcoming Events

The latest updates and gatherings involving the Britex Community. Stay up to date and make sure to mark your calendars.

Blog

Information and tutorials for folks interested in antique Italian lacework, nouveau fashion, sewing techniques and much much more!

 

Tag Archives: textile art

The Britex Blog

Filter
  • Beyond the Surface: Worldwide Embroidery Traditions at the de Young

    March 6, 2017 by Britex Fabrics

    beyond_the_surface_homepage

    Beyond the Surface: Worldwide Embroidery Traditions is a show that features embroidered costumes and accessories from around the world, and the garment and textiles featured will have distinct characteristics from the time period and region where they were created. Embroidery, which is the stitching of patterns in cloth with a needle and thread has been a technique used to embellish costumes and textiles for centuries. Embroidery may be used purely as a decorative embellishment, but may also be used to construct a garment as well. The threads, patterns, and/or colors may indicate who created the garment.

    "Embroidery stitches, of which there are many different kinds, derive from three basic types: flat, knotted, and linked and looped. Flat stitches, such as running and satin stitches, are individual stitches that lie atop a fabric’s surface and are made without crossing or looping the thread. Knotted stitches, where the thread is knotted upon itself, are used to create raised patterns and textures. Linked and looped stitches, such as chain, are formed by securing a stitch with the following one and are used to create bands of embroidery."

    For more information or to order tickets for Beyond the Surface: Worldwide Embroidery Traditions, please visit the de Young website here.

     


  • On the Grid - Textiles & Minimalism at the de Young

    January 31, 2017 by Britex Fabrics

    edo_buddhist_web
    Now on display in the Wais and Knowles Galleries of Textile Arts at the de Young Museum, experience On the Grid: Textiles and Minimalism. This exhibit features textiles from around the world, all which share similar aesthetics found in minimalist works. The universal principles of design, such as symmetry, grids, repetition and simple forms are found in the artworks on display.

     

    2013-10

    "Minimalist art is based upon pre-existing systems that conceive of the artwork in advance of its actual execution. These systems, often mathematical, rely on the repetition of simple forms. Textiles by their very nature comply with these core elements, and textile artists, like the Minimal artists, predetermine the finished work through their selection and processing of materials and in the warping or preparing of the loom. On the Grid examines these processes and further explores both the preeminence of weaving in the textile design vocabulary and its influences on the design of painted and dyed pieces that also conform to Minimalism’s repetition of forms and the grid as patterning devices."

    This show expresses "beauty in simplicity", through abstraction, precision, geometry, materiality and the process itself.
    For more information or to order tickets, please visit the de Young website here.

     


  • Textile Arts At the de Young - Sumatran Ship Cloth

    January 23, 2017 by Britex Fabrics

    textmain
    The textile arts collection at the de Young contains over 13,000 textiles and costumes from all over the world. The collection contains loom-woven textiles, and non-woven fabrics from bark cloth, felt, knitting and object embellishments, including beading and embroidery. Some of the highlights include Turkmen carpets, rare 12th 0 15th century Asian and North Indian silks, European tapestries, and contemporary Bay Area fiber art. The de Young has been known for its 20th-century couture exhibits from the post-World War II era. Some of the memorable pieces on display are by Christian Dior, Cristóbal Balenciaga, Madame Grés, Yves Saint Laurent and Coco Chanel.

    2010-18_webOne of the interesting exhibits on display now until February 12th, 2017, experience The Sumatran Ship Cloth exhibit in Gallery 31 at the de Young. This exhibit represents the three ceremonial textiles from the Lampung region of south Sumatra, a region of Indonesia where ship imagery is a major theme in woven arts.

    "For many Indonesians, the sea represents their lifeblood, and ship imagery reflects social structures, rituals, and cosmological beliefs. These textiles from the Museums’ permanent collection, dating from the 19th and 20th centuries, are being shown for the first time."

    For more information or to purchase tickets, please visit the de Young website here.

     


  • Textiles & Brains…oh, my!

    October 15, 2010 by Britex Fabrics


    Marjorie Taylor and Dr. Karen Norberg are textile artists, writers and academics that make amazingly beautiful textile art, including art that features that magnificent organ, the brain. Inspired by scientific research, their stunning work is automatically correct, and includes techniques such as rug hooking, quilting, appliqué, embroidery, beadwork, knitting, and crocheting. Materials include fabric, yarn, metallic threads, electronic components such as magnetic core memory, and wire, zippers, and beads. I am practically enamored with Ms. Taylor’s piece, "Velvet Cortex" (2006). The soft folds of the midnight blue velvet holds incredible and mysterious depths. Their work is featured in The Museum of Scientifically Accurate Fabric Brain Art.


  • Embroidered Artwork - Marlene Bloomberg

    May 19, 2010 by Britex Fabrics

    French artisan Marlene Bloomberg buys embroidery floss and mat fabric from Britex Fabrics to create her remarkable textile artwork. She uses her well-honed textile techniques to produce pointillist work bordering on the surreal. Her work is done on 24 stitch canvas, and she uses embroidery stitches including the tent stitch, bullion knots, French knots, and chain stitch. She believes that “Art is meant to set people free from the humdrum reality of everyday life. When there is a balance between emotion, shape, and color, magic can emerge; and only then can one get a glimpse of the eternal triangle of truth, goodness, and beauty.


  • Annette Streyl, Artist

    September 1, 2009 by Britex Fabrics

    Annette Streyl is a German artist who makes amazing sculptures of urban landscapes that are knitted, and then stretched over metal frames. The Reichstag (built 1894), or seat of the German Parliament, is particularly impressive! Click on the without framework button to see the building fold.
    The Reichstag by Annette Strely


6 Item(s)