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Tag Archives: guest blogger

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  • Easy Double Welt Pockets by NEW Guest Blogger Becky (sewbeckyjo.com)

    July 24, 2017 by Britex Fabrics

    double-welt-01 Double welt pockets look so scary. There’s little dots, little triangles, blind sewing, to bias or not to bias, more blind sewing with the lining….and the worst part? You’re cutting a hole smack in the middle of fabric. There’s no going back after you cut that hole.Worse? Half the time they’re this unusable, shallow size. I don’t like fiddley or inefficiency. I think it’s time we knocked double welts off their pedestal. I’ve made a very photo-detailed tutorial with the help of Britex Fabrics, and you’ll be whipping these out in no time. I chose this Midweight Royal Purple Linen for this project.  

  • Silk Baby Hems by Guest Blogger Sophie Hines

    July 20, 2017 by Sophie Hines

    photo-1 So crop tops and cute bralettes are all the rage lately - but how do you actually incorporate them into your wardrobe? It may be a bit daring for some, but I love pairing my long line Euler Bralette with a sheer silk shirt! Sewing with silk can be tricky if you haven’t tried it, but there are so many tips on the internet, you can quickly get your bearings!!

  • Modern Lingerie Knit Tutorial (Sophie Hines)

    April 29, 2017 by Sophie Hines

    sh1 Hello Britex Readers!! My name is Sophie Hines, and I make minimal, modern lingerie out of my studio in Denver, Colorado. My goal is to make comfortable lingerie that is environmentally sustainable and ethical in business practices. I’m so excited to present my first two sewing patterns, the Euler Bralette and Arccos Undies, in printed and downloadable PDF form!! If you’ve been to Britex lately, I’m sure you’ve seen their incredible knit section – just perfect for some new undies, check out their incredible knit section online – I couldn’t resist trying out some beautiful tee shirt weight cotton knit!

  • Stretch Lace Tee Tutorial by Guest Blogger Nicole (NicoleAtHome)

    February 27, 2017 by Nicole at Home

    img_5747 Did you ever consider that stretch lace could be used to sew up a simple tee shirt?  It just takes the right pattern and a few small sewing modifications!  Here, I've used this lovely stretch lace in "Naughty Navy".

  • Red Plaid Wool Jacket with Scarf by Guest Blogger Shams (Communing With Fabric)

    December 5, 2016 by Communing with Fabric

    img_4041-red-wool-plaid Hey! It's Shams from Communing with Fabric with another project made from a fabulous Britex fabric! For this project, my assignment was to choose one of Britex's beautiful wools. I visited the store just a couple days before I left for Europe to make my choice. After much deliberation, I selected Mock Patchwork Plaid Wool.

  • How to Sew In-Seam Pockets into a Waist Seam (Christine Haynes - Citystitching)

    November 21, 2016 by CityStitching

    dress-2 Like most people, I love having pockets in my garments. Pockets can come in many forms–patch, welt, in-seam, etc–depending on the garment and the style. One of the most common pocket styles to find in dresses and skirts are in-seam pockets. An in-seam pocket is where the pocket is literally sewn into the side seam, so it becomes invisible to see on the outside of the garment, but is right there at the hip whenever you need it. For dresses, typically the in-seam pocket is simply sewn into the garment as part of the side seam. The pocket floats in the seam, flapping around on the inside of the dress. This is the only option if the garment has no horizontal seams across the body. Sometimes this causes the pocket to pull on the side seam, creating drag lines in a drapey fabric, and making a flattering garment anything but.

  • Rolled Seam Tutorial With New Guest Blogger Nanna From Denmark (HowToDoFashion)

    November 8, 2016 by howtodofashion

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    A while back Britex asked me if I would be a Guest Blogger. One of the difficult tasks of this assignment was to choose the fabric. I decided to work with a fabric that I think many people may be afraid to work with, chiffon. I love this blue chiffon fashion novelty fabric, it is light, and with the right sewing techniques, this fabric can turn into the most magical garment. The two techniques I always use when sewing with chiffon is a French seam and a rolled seam for hemming. In this post, I will show you how to make a rolled seam on your sewing machine.


  • Sewing With Knits - Tips by Bianca (VintageOnTap)

    September 26, 2016 by VintageOnTap

    seamwork-elmira-017 2016 has been Vintage on Tap’s year to finally tackle sewing with knits. This year, I’ve already made three knit pieces: a bathing suit, cropped sweater, and a yummy jersey top. For this project, I was looking forward to bringing rich Fall colors into my wardrobe, so I went with a Purple Rayon Jersey Knit. seamwork-elmira-005

  • A Different Kind of Shirt By Guest Blogger Jamie (MaleDevonSewing)

    September 7, 2016 by MaleDevonSewing

    As you may know, I love shirts. Not just wearing them but of course making them too. Although shirt styles are all fairly similar (well at least for men) you can always have fun playing with the details: Different collars and cuff shapes, placket styles and of course fun fabric and buttons. So when I was asked to make a shirt for my guest blog post, I jumped at the opportunity. I wanted to do something a little different though; something a bit wild and fun. Over the years I have made countless different shirts but there was one particular style I had yet to make: The Guayabera. You don’t see many over here in the UK but I have always been drawn to the relaxed yet precision aspects of such a shirt: The pleats, pintucks, curved yoke and four pockets were enough for me. The fabric had to make a statement too. It had to be bright with a fun design so what better than a cotton print with pink with little birds!   IMG_2171 I drafted the pattern myself, opting for a normal collar with stand, a triple point curved yoke, pintucked fronts and back with a central double pleat down the spine. Four pocket ‘through’ the pintucks and a cuffed hem. Before cutting the double pleat and two rows of pintucks were added to a piece of fabric that would form the back. The pleat was simple enough but I had to carefully measure the position of the pintucks so they would meet the pointed yoke.   IMG_2179

  • Reversible 7-Gore Skirt

    July 18, 2016 by Communing with Fabric

    Capture1
      Hey! It's Shams of Communing with Fabric with another garment made from a beautiful Britex fabric! For this project, my assignment was to choose a fabric from the Knits category. I quickly settled on this beautiful double-sided ponte made from cotton, polyester, and lycra.
    Reversible Black and Cardinal Red Cotton Blend Knit Fabric Click the image to see this fabric on the Britex site. It's also available in sky blue (Note that some of the photos show this fabric as a bright red, but it's actually a heathered red in real life)
     
    This fabric is wonderful! It has more drape than some of its stiffer ponte cousins. It feels like a rayon and I was surprised to learn that it contains cotton, but no rayon. It is beefy, so it hangs nicely, but it's also a bit "sproingy". It presses beautifully. I threw it into the washer and dryer before cutting and it looked just the same afterwards. I didn't measure to determine the amount of shrinkage, but I suspect that it shrank a bit. Because it's a double knit, it's very easy to sew. If you are afraid of sewing knits, a ponte (double knit) fabric is a good way to get started. It doesn't curl at the edges due to it's double-sided construction. This ponte stretches in both directions, but it's also fairly stable. I wanted to feature both sides of the fabric and I seriously dithered about how to use it. I was torn between a top and a skirt and I knew exactly how I wanted to make each but, in the end, the skirt won out. I drafted a 7-gore skirt. Why 7 gores? I find the asymmetry of an uneven number of gores aesthetically pleasing. In order to use both sides of the fabric, I drafted the pattern with 1" seam allowances and a 1" hem. The only exception was the waist seam, which has a 1/2" seam allowance. I sewed the 1" seams with the black side facing the black side. I decided to funk it up by constructing it in a car wash style so I sewed each gore 15" down from the waist, and left the rest of the seam unsewn. I turned each seam allowance and hem segment to the red side and folded it under, turning the 1" seam allowance into a 1/2" trim. I secured each seam allowance, individually, to the red side by hand. You could do this by machine, but I like the effect of hand sewing—I have more control.
    IMG_20160716_090826-7-gore-skirt
      As part of this process, I mitered all 14 corners at the hemline. Mitering is important to manage the bulk that would result if you merely turned up the trim on each edge.
    IMG_3344-7-gore-skirt
      An advantage of such a clean finish is that the skirt is fully reversible! The red side features black trim, and the black side is solid black.
    IMG_3390-7-gore-skirt
     
    It might be summer elsewhere, but when I took these pics this morning it was 50°F, windy, foggy, wet, drippy, and misty. In short, it was COLD and more like winter weather than summer weather!
    IMG_3353-7-gore-skirt IMG_3377-7-gore-skirt
    I didn't include a pic of the waistband, and I never tuck a top, but I attached a casing for elastic using the black side of the fabric. Because of the car wash effect, both sides flash the reverse color as I move. This skirt is a lot of fun to wear!

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