New!

New silk fabric, woolen fabric, cotton fabric, buttons, lace trims, and more...each month brings new temptations!

Upcoming Events

The latest updates and gatherings involving the Britex Community. Stay up to date and make sure to mark your calendars.

Blog

Information and tutorials for folks interested in antique Italian lacework, nouveau fashion, sewing techniques and much much more!

Guest Blogger

The Britex Blog

Filter
  • Adjusting a Pattern For a Reversible Knit Fabric (CSews)

    February 15, 2017 by Chuleenan of CSews

    header-reversible-blog   For a long time, I've been intrigued with the idea of making something reversible. I got the opportunity with this wonderful reversible ponte knit fabric at Britex Fabrics. It has a really nice weight and drape. This lovely heathered red is a warm black on the reverse. Sometimes the black seems dark brown to me and other times it seems black, depending on the lighting. reversible-1

  • Metallic Linen Palazzo Pant Jumpsuit + Fashion Inspiration by Guest Blogger Jamie Lau

    January 31, 2017 by Jamie Lau Designs

    jld_novelty_01312017_main I’m often drawn to fabrics with texture, particularly fashion novelty fabrics. I particularly love working with metallic brocades when I want to achieve a certain luxury feel. You may recall this Linen Palazzo Pant Jumpsuit style from one of my previous posts. It is definitely a customer favorite! I have been exploring new fabrics to offer it in this season and was happy to find this beautiful, luxurious linen novelty fabric. The metallic finish adds visual interest and elevates the material, yet still meets my criteria for functionality since it is a linen. A brocade would be too thick for the look and ease of this silhouette. Plus, I wanted to work with a fabric that was easy to care for.

  • Two-tone Linen Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Guest Blogger Nicole (NicoleAtHome)

    January 3, 2017 by Nicole at Home

    img_5541 Who says you can't wear linen in the winter?  Using some amazing linen knit fabric from Britex Fabrics, I sewed up a beautiful and warm color-blocked infinity scarf, perfect for the colder months.  For my version, I chose two different colors--turquoise and navy--but this tutorial would work equally well if you wanted to go with a single color of fabric.   Here's what to do.

  • Little Red Pinup Holiday Dress Project by Guest Blogger Bianca (VintageOnTap)

    December 21, 2016 by VintageOnTap

    December is always an excuse to drown myself in the holiday spirit, surrounding myself in red and white and gold. The opportunity to stitch up a dress for the season couldn’t be missed, so I decided to sew Butterick B5603, a pattern I’ve had in my stash for a while. Pairing up with both Britex Fabrics and fellow seamstress Allie J, I got to work.  
    Techniques I specifically cover in my video were the creation of silk organza strips that are used to stabilize bias cut edges including the neck, arm scythes, and the top of the skirt to prevent warping or stretching. I also discuss underlining the entire garment in silk charmeuse and break down the process, step by step.
     

  • Red Plaid Wool Jacket with Scarf by Guest Blogger Shams (Communing With Fabric)

    December 5, 2016 by Communing with Fabric

    img_4041-red-wool-plaid Hey! It's Shams from Communing with Fabric with another project made from a fabulous Britex fabric! For this project, my assignment was to choose one of Britex's beautiful wools. I visited the store just a couple days before I left for Europe to make my choice. After much deliberation, I selected Mock Patchwork Plaid Wool.

  • How to Sew In-Seam Pockets into a Waist Seam (Christine Haynes - Citystitching)

    November 21, 2016 by CityStitching

    dress-2 Like most people, I love having pockets in my garments. Pockets can come in many forms–patch, welt, in-seam, etc–depending on the garment and the style. One of the most common pocket styles to find in dresses and skirts are in-seam pockets. An in-seam pocket is where the pocket is literally sewn into the side seam, so it becomes invisible to see on the outside of the garment, but is right there at the hip whenever you need it. For dresses, typically the in-seam pocket is simply sewn into the garment as part of the side seam. The pocket floats in the seam, flapping around on the inside of the dress. This is the only option if the garment has no horizontal seams across the body. Sometimes this causes the pocket to pull on the side seam, creating drag lines in a drapey fabric, and making a flattering garment anything but.

  • Rolled Seam Tutorial With New Guest Blogger Nanna From Denmark (HowToDoFashion)

    November 8, 2016 by howtodofashion

    6

    A while back Britex asked me if I would be a Guest Blogger. One of the difficult tasks of this assignment was to choose the fabric. I decided to work with a fabric that I think many people may be afraid to work with, chiffon. I love this blue chiffon fashion novelty fabric, it is light, and with the right sewing techniques, this fabric can turn into the most magical garment. The two techniques I always use when sewing with chiffon is a French seam and a rolled seam for hemming. In this post, I will show you how to make a rolled seam on your sewing machine.


  • Tips For Sewing With Silk

    October 25, 2016 by MissCrayolaCreepy

    miss-crayola-creepy-britex-named-asaka-kimono-7 Have you ever been afraid of sewing with a fabric for absolutely no reason? I was terrified of sewing with silk chiffon because I had heard that it was difficult to sew. Unfortunately, my fear of sewing with silk definitely outweighed by love of wearing it. Well, until I made this lovely Named Asaka Kimono top, that is. If I wanted this fabric/pattern combo to work I would need to immediately take a chill pill and get over my silly little fear. pattern

  • Catch-Stitching a Hem (Two Variations) Tutorial

    October 11, 2016 by MsJennyHomeMaker

    jenny-1 Hello again, everyone! This month, I thought I’d share a more daily-wear item.  Wool pencil skirts in various weights are a staple in my wardrobe, nearly year-round.  Some of my favorites are made from double cloth or double serge wool, so when I spotted this cool pale blue wool double-cloth, I knew it would be perfect for a transitional skirt.  When I received it, I saw it had an interesting texture, so I decided to pick a slightly more fun and casual pattern, forgoing my usual Simplicity 2154 for Simplicity 8175. And I’m so glad I did – the fabric paired beautifully and I have a new favorite skirt! jenny-2

  • Satin Party Dress – How to Add Volume to a Skirt (MsJennyHomemaker)

    September 13, 2016 by MsJennyHomeMaker

    Hello! I'm Jenny and I blog at Jenny Homemaker.  I'm so excited to join the team of talented Britex Fabrics guest bloggers and share my first project with you! dress 1 Apparently, I decided to go all out for my first garment, but how could I not after spying Britex's beautiful selection of rayon blend satins?!  This "summer sky" in particular caught my eye immediately, as I'd sketched this dress (Simplicity 1873) in a similar color last year.  By the way, in case you’re curious if it really is as vibrant as the website shows, it is!  I've worked with a lot of light silks recently, but I had volume in mind for this particular dress, and this rayon/cotton satin gives that a bit of a head start.  For a party dress like this, I recommend starting with a fabric with a somewhat stiffer hand than your average satins.  This will give the pleats a great shape. Then, there are a few things you can do for even more "oomph".  Side note: you can use these tricks on softer fabrics as well, just be careful to choose the right weights for your fabric. The first trick for volume, is to underline your satin with petticoat net.  This will add a bit of that petticoat shape, without having to wear an extra garment.  A huge plus for those of us who have hot summers. To underline your satin, cut the net using the same pattern pieces as for your outer fabric.  Then, cut your outer fabric, marking all stitching lines (including pleats, darts, etc) and the fold line for your hem.  Pin the net layer to the wrong side of the satin and hand-baste the two layers together using cotton or silk thread, right along all of the traced lines.  Then, construct the garment as you normally would.  Bonus: if you like to hand-stitch your seam allowances in place, you can do so, stitching them only to the net and you don't have to worry about any stitches showing on the outside.

120 Items(s)

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. ...
  7. 12