New!

New silk fabric, woolen fabric, cotton fabric, buttons, lace trims, and more...each month brings new temptations!

Upcoming Events

The latest updates and gatherings involving the Britex Community. Stay up to date and make sure to mark your calendars.

Blog

Information and tutorials for folks interested in antique Italian lacework, nouveau fashion, sewing techniques and much much more!

User Archives: CityStitching

The Britex Blog

Filter
  • How to Sew In-Seam Pockets into a Waist Seam (Christine Haynes - Citystitching)

    November 21, 2016 by CityStitching

    dress-2 Like most people, I love having pockets in my garments. Pockets can come in many forms–patch, welt, in-seam, etc–depending on the garment and the style. One of the most common pocket styles to find in dresses and skirts are in-seam pockets. An in-seam pocket is where the pocket is literally sewn into the side seam, so it becomes invisible to see on the outside of the garment, but is right there at the hip whenever you need it. For dresses, typically the in-seam pocket is simply sewn into the garment as part of the side seam. The pocket floats in the seam, flapping around on the inside of the dress. This is the only option if the garment has no horizontal seams across the body. Sometimes this causes the pocket to pull on the side seam, creating drag lines in a drapey fabric, and making a flattering garment anything but.

  • Silk Clover Dress With French Seam Tutorial - By Guest Blogger Christine Haynes

    August 9, 2016 by CityStitching

    silk-dress-1   When Britex offered me some midnight navy spotted silk to sew with, I thought I might make a kimono robe or another lounge item. But when the silk showed up, it was just too gorgeous to only wear at home, so I decided to sew the Clover Dress from Paper Cut Patterns, and it was a perfect match.   When sewing with silk, especially one that is semi-transparent, having gorgeous seams is key since there’s a good chance that they will be visible through the garment. This is when using a French Seam is a perfect choice, and if you don’t know how to sew one, here’s a handy tutorial for you!   french-seam-1   Note: the tutorial is sewn using a scrap piece of the silk, not on the garment itself.   french-seam-2 Step 1: After you have cut all your pieces according to the pattern instructions, the key is sewing them in a reverse order from how they instruct you to sew a regular seam. So instead of right sides together, we will be putting wrong sides together. Pin in place.   french-seam-3 Step 2: Sew the seam at 3/8” seam allowance. Trim the seam allowance down to 1/8”.   french-seam-4 Step 3: Press the seam allowance to one side.   french-seam-5 Step 4: Fold the fabric so right sides are together and the seam sewn in step 1 is right at the top of the fold. Press the seam.   french-seam-6 Step 5: Pin the fabric together and stitch at 1/4” seam allowance. The 1/4” and 3/8” will equal a 5/8” seam allowance. Should your project have a different sized seam allowance, these two amounts added up will need to match the total seam allowance and adjust accordingly.

2 Item(s)